Friday, March 27, 2009

Will Social Media Kill the Radio Star?

This fantastic photo is by Matt Hamm.


Check out this thought provoking article in Email Insider “Will Social Media Kill the Email Star?”

The short answer is, no. The long answer is, maybe.

Social media has fundamentally changed email communications forever. Here’s why:

  • Because of our experience with social media, which is highly personal in tone and relevance, we now expect commercial/organizational emailers to follow suit. As the author says, “batch and blast” just doesn’t measure up.
  • Many organizational emails aren’t RELEVANT, i.e. they don’t speak to me as an individual and they don’t add VALUE to my day.
  • Many organizational emails are driven by brands while social media is driven by people. You can't talk to a brand. You can talk to a person.

What to do?
  • Give your email a human voice. Who is your most enthusiastic employee? Ask them to collaborate on your content.
  • Use data on your stakeholders to create and deliver communications which will speak to ME. This is such a no-brainer but does take time and effort. You’ve simply got to figure out who your online stakeholders are and what they want from you.
  • Finally, do something different with your email. Embed a video, hold a contest, DON’T ask for a donation. In short, mix up your messaging and see what happens.
Cheers!
Jocelyn

This post is also archived on Triplex Interactive.

2 comments:

Adam said...

We've had success sharing best practices and tips through our email newsletters. We find that when we provide strong value in the form of resources and whitepapers, recipients are much more amenable to to taking the next step and starting a conversation.

Anonymous said...

Social Media is a flash in the pan- and represents less than 1% of 1% of all donations to non-profits. Interestingly, there was another big little company that peaked at 50 million users about 10 years ago. It had a whole network of people that self-selected themselves in affinity groups and sent and received email. Marketers drooled over the possibilities.

What happened? They moved on. Oh yeah, the company was called AOL.