Tuesday, November 17, 2009

No More Bull

Commentary On Trust With Larry Checco

Check out this new NPR podcast featuring my frolleauge Larry Checco, Principal, Checco Communications.

Larry reminds us that great brands are not built on bull#$&!. On the contrary, great organizations are build on transparency, accountability and responsibility.

Can your donors, members, advocates and employees trust your organization? Do you live by your word? Do you apologize and take responsibility for your mistakes?

Take heed. It's VERY hard to earn back trust. Better to be clear, honest and open in all your dealings with all your stakeholders all the time.

Cheers!

Jocelyn

4 comments:

Joe Garecht said...

Establishing trust is more important than ever... with so many people (including charities) stung by Bernie Madoff and his ilk, and by the economy, people want to know that the organizations they support are trustworthy and honest, and that they will be around for a long time.

Larry Checco said...

Thanks Joe for what I take as an endorsement of my commentary. I'm concerned with how we've insidiously allowed trust, honesty, integrity--and shame--to be leached from our culture. As we can all see, it's not serving us well.

Scott Anderson, PhD said...

Thanks for this post. Trust, accountability, and transparency are, and will continue in 2010 to be, critical factors for nonprofits seeking funds (see 5 things to know in 2010 at http://tinyurl.com/ygk9fky
). My concern, however, is that many in the nonprofit world may not take time to understand what "accountability" or "transparency" mean in practical terms. In my mind, it's not just "I showed you what we're doing," but rather "I showed you what we're doing, and what we're doing is maximizing every penny you've given us." That's a different level of accountability, and I strongly believe that's the level of accountability that will get funders' attention and support.

Larry Checco said...

Thanks for the comment Scott. I think it might clarify things if we substitute the word "outcomes" for "accountability." For example, nonprofit X, that works in the field of affordable housing, had 500 people come through its doors last year. To some degree, that's being accountable. But of those 500 people, how many were they able to successfully complete the organization's financial literacy course. Of those, how many were able to purchase homes. And perhaps more importantly these days, how many are still in those homes. Those our the kinds of outcomes sophisticated major donors are looking for.